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Archive for the ‘What We’ve Been Reading’ Category

This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

Republican candidates seem ready “to provoke a constitutional crisis over abortion.”

NJ gets serious about school bullying.

What happened to Sarah Palin‘s political glamour?

British fashion designer, John Galliano, was convicted of “public insults for reasons of religion, race or ethnicity” for “dirty Jews” comment. While we may personally relish the conviction, freedom of speech is a better antidote for antisemitism and hatred generally, all things considered.

Federal court blocks Florida law preventing doctors from questioning patients about guns.

Also in Florida, representatives of the teachers union sues over the constitutionality of the recently passed merit pay bill.

The New Yorker‘s Reeves Wiedeman and Nick Paumgarten discuss the fall of Federer and the rise of Djokovic and Nadal.

R. Aharon Lichtenstein reflects on the anniversary of 9/11.

Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

NYT’s John Tierney illustrates “decision fatigue” with an Israeli parole board.

Rebecca Traister’s excellent piece in the New York Time’s magazine criticizing the WWHHD (What Would Hillary Have Done) crowd.

The (hopefully) sarcastic musing on an abortion clinic “Hosing” obnoxious protestors.

An interesting take on the United States’s primary military rivals – China, India, and the Soviet Union?  Yeah, that is what I was afraid of too.

Watch hurricane tweets out-running Hurricane Irene in realtime.

This week’s NYT Magazine has a fascinating article on the unique intensity of professional tennis rivalries.

Slate‘s Terry Turnipseed thinks the president’s using an autopen to sign bills is unconstitutional.

Guest-blogging at Volokh Conspiracy, Mitch Berman discusses his recently published article, “Let ‘em Play”: A Study in the Jurisprudence of Sport.”

NPR has this wonderful county-by-county map of Florida’s average teacher salaries.

Florida’s legislature doing the people’s will by forcing kids (in school) to pull up their pants.  The only question is what is more important, banning sagging pants or bestiality – a question for the ages.

This New York Times op-ed about the problems of college athletics completely ignores that we are using and abusing the players themselves.

Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

VC’s David Bernstein has an interesting post on the housing-cost demonstrations in Israel. Michael Walzer has a different take. Amoz Oz, another take.

Jihadi Jew suggests that Jews can relate to Ramadan (via).

Fareed Zakaria makes the case for cutting the defense budget.

Steve Benen thinks “Obama is the most effective politician since Reagan, and depending on the day, perhaps even the most effective politician since LBJ.”

Rabbi Eric Yoffie has “no patience for survival Judaism.”

Shoshie, guest-blogging at Feministe, has an interesting post on why she is religious, in a feminist context.

A black and Jewish Hollywood writer describes her struggle with affirmative action.

SCOTUSblog is hosting a series of essays on the constitutionality of ObamaCare.

As it turns out, the Supreme Court relies on legal scholarship more than the Chief Justice thinks.

Rosie, the first judicially approved courtroom dog in New York, comforts a young girl while she testifies about being raped, sparking legal debate.

Slate‘s William Saletan has a sobering article on twin reductions and abortions.

How the “hottest training camp in the NFL” deals with losing “collective[ly] 450 pounds of fluid during each two-hour practice last week.”

Op-ed piece from the Wall Street Journal completely misrepresenting Buffet’s Tax piece in the New York Times while failing to actually meaningfully disagree on the issues.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

Ezra Klein outlines the winners and losers of the debt-ceiling deal.

The New Yorker‘s Hendrik Hertzberg on how terminology influenced the debt-ceiling negotiations.

WaPo’s Charles Krauthammer has a thought-provoking article on competing visions of American greatness, as illustrated by the debt-ceiling debate.

Will Wilkinson on presidential candidate Newt Gingrich’s “theology of exceptionalism“.

Failed Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork thinks the Balanced Budget Amendment is a bad idea.

Lawyer up in 15 minutes – will this make society MORE litigious (as if that is possible)?

Eugene Volokh has an excellent post on the meaning and scope of free speech.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

Commentary‘s Omri Ceren calls out NYTimes columnist Thomas Friedman on his “faux Middle East expertise”.

Professor Nancy Sherman has an interesting article on “the moral logic of survivor guilt.”

DSK and Casey Anthony: The American Justice System at Its Best

Philip Getz responds to The Nation‘s anti-Birthright piece.

TNR’s Michael Kazin on how the president’s “short-sighted view of U.S. politics” prevents him from becoming the FDR-like leader that liberals hoped for and conservatives feared.

Some troubling trends about emigration from Israel.

Slate‘s Dahlia Lithwick reminds us of the importance of criminal juries in the aftermath of Casey Anthony’s acquittal.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

A man desperate for medical care “walked into a Gastonia, N.C., bank and handed the cashier a note demanding $1 and medical attention. Then he waited calmly for police to show up.”

Historian David McCullough laments Americans’ poor knowledge of history.

TNR’s Jonathan Chait on the conservative backlash against Bush’s “compassionate conservatism”.

Mark Savignac argues that President Obama has already endorsed same-sex marriage, but cleverly enough that nobody noticed.

Next term, the Supreme Court will decide whether “an American born in Jerusalem may list his birthplace as Israel in his passport.”

Trent Dougherty argues that philosophers are “stuck with the weird. . . . that we face a choice among mysteries, not a choice between mystery and something else.”

Ichthus77 hosts Philosophers’ Carnival #127.

Bill Schneider on the death of the Bush Doctrine.

A Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist outs himself as an illegal immigrant to a national audience.

VC’s David Bernstein paints a different picture of famed Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Let us know what you’ve been reading in the comments.

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This feature is a collaboration, with contributions from all of us.

According to Slate‘s Annie Lowrey, “Commuting is a migraine-inducing life-suck” that “cause[s] obesity, neck pain, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia.”

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz’s recent marriage to Shoshana Stein is tearing up the blogosphere.

Recently retired Justice John Paul Stevens still has plenty to say about American jurisprudence.

Iowa and New Hampshire presidential primaries exert is disproportionate influence election outcomes, which Marie Diamond argues undermines our democracy.

TNR’s Jonathan Chait and Jonathan Cohn debate Mitt Romney’s chances of winning the Republican nomination.

Columbia professor John McWhorter reviews Punishing Race: A Continuing American Dilemma, by Michael Tonry, and challenges the popular narrative it tells about racism and the war on drugs.

The New York Times recently reported that Obama is underwriting non-censored internet access in countries with censorship of the interwebs.

Justin Driver has an interesting article tracing the legal influences on President Obama, specifically Laurence Tribe, his professor at Harvard, and Cass Sunstein, his colleague at the University of Chicago.

What about “secular shabbat”?

Kierra Feldman of The Nation describes the history and development of Birthright, and talks about participants who with “birth left.”

In The Lochner Ness Monster, Commentary Magazine reviews Rehabilitating Lochner: Defending Individual Rights Against Progressive Reform.  The title suggests a fair-handed analysis of progressive reform by a Professor at George Mason School of Law. Lochner’s progeny outlawed, among other things, (1) the state’s ability to ban “Yellow Dog Contracts” – wherein an employee agrees not to join a labor union, (2) minimum wage laws, and (my favorite) (3) striking down child-labor laws. Oh to have been an American 100 years ago.

Doctors recently tested a new “beatless” heart in a human being for the first time – amazing!!!

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